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Welcome to my free series on learning to code. Through this free series, you will go from zero experience to deploying your first full-stack web application. Along the way, I’ll teach you the essential web development concepts needed for 2021 and beyond.

Please share this series with the hashtag #fullstackroadmap and help me spread the word!

Where I will be updating this course

All updates to this series will be made on my Github repository.

If you don’t have an account on Github, create one now. You need to do this to follow along with this series, but this will also be the account that employers will look at when you are interviewing for jobs (so make sure your username is professional). …


See this lesson on YouTube here

This is part of my fullstack developer series, where you’ll go from never having written a line of code to deploying your first fullstack web application to the internet. Click this link to get an overview of what this series is all about.

Please tag me on Twitter @zg_dev and share this series with #100DaysOfCode!

Useful series links


This is part of my full-stack developer series, where you’ll go from never having written a line of code to deploying your first full-stack web application to the internet. Click this link to get an overview of what this series is all about.

Please share this series with the hashtag #fullstackroadmap and help me spread the word!

Useful series links


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Here is the YouTube version of this lesson.

This is part of my fullstack developer series, where you’ll go from never having written a line of code to deploying your first fullstack web application to the internet. Click this link to get an overview of what this series is all about.

Please share this series with the hashtag #fullstackroadmap and help me spread the word!

Go to prior lesson

Go to next lesson (coming soon…)

Hold yourself accountable with 100 days of code

Today marks the first lesson where we actually start writing some real code. Because of this, I encourage you to take the 100 days of code challenge. This is a challenge created by Alexander Kallaway, who was a guy just like you and me trying to hold himself accountable to learning to code. …


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Here is the YouTube version of this lesson.

This is part of my fullstack developer series, where you’ll go from never having written a line of code to deploying your first fullstack web application to the internet. Click this link to get an overview of what this series is all about.

Please share this series with the hashtag #fullstackroadmap and help me spread the word!

Go to prior lesson

Go to next lesson

How to read this lesson

Unlike many of the posts I write, this one is going to be in the form of a detailed Q&A session. …


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This is part of my fullstack developer series, where you’ll go from never having written a line of code to deploying your first fullstack web application to the internet. Click this link to get an overview of what this series is all about.

Please share this series with the hashtag #fullstackroadmap and help me spread the word!

Go to prior lesson

Go to next lesson

Where do we start?

If you’re reading this, you’ve most likely never written a line of code in your life, but want to learn. There are about a hundred different ways that we could get you on your feet and get started, but I think one of the best ways to get started is by seeing what’s possible with very minimal effort. …


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See the YouTube version of this here.

When searching for a career path or even trying to figure out what bootcamp to go to or what online course to take, knowing the differences between front, back, and full-stack development is a big piece to the puzzle.

In this post, I’m going to show you specific examples of each and attempt to explain why this topic is so confusing to most people.

Zoom wayyyy out

First, let’s get clear on what type of software engineering we are talking about here. When someone says any of these terms, they are talking specifically about web developers.

What’s a web developer? Well, you might have guessed already, but a web dev is someone who builds the experiences we have when we open up our Google Chrome, Safari, Edge, Firefox, or other web browser. …


So you’re learning to code, but there are so many choices as to where you are actually writing that code. To the beginner, this topic may sound intimidating, so let’s start by looking at the entire landscape of code editors.

What are the possibilities here?

While others may disagree with this classification, here are four places that you might write code in order of least to most features.

  1. OS-based text editor (Microsoft has Notepad, Mac has TextEdit)
  2. Terminal based text editor (Vim, Emacs, Nano)
  3. Code Editors (Visual Studio Code, Atom, Sublime Text)
  4. Integrated Development Environments, or “IDEs” (Visual Studio, PyCharm, Eclipse, NetBeans)

While you may not recognize all of these, they all do the same fundamental thing, which is to allow the developer to write code. …


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See the YouTube version of this here.

If you’re reading this now, you’re most likely in one of two camps:

  1. You are considering a career change and want to become a software engineer
  2. You are on the path to becoming a software engineer but are having second thoughts about it

I’m not sure if this is a motivational post, sales pitch, or just a quick moment of reassurance to help you push past your anxieties and fears, but in the next few minutes, I’m going to explain why I think learning to code is worth it. No matter what.

The 1st Hurdle: Learning to code is super difficult

Let’s cut to the chase — Learning to code is agonizing. Even if you’re learning “the easy stuff” right now, teaching your brain to speak another language is extremely difficult. It also doesn’t help to see developers all over the web doing what you want to do and making it look easy (even though in reality, these developers probably pulled their hair out trying to get that “easy” thing to work). So let’s not delude ourselves for one minute and accept the fact that learning to code, no matter what your age, is one of the hardest educational challenges you will face in your life. …


If you read this post start to finish, you’re going to walk away knowing:

  1. What this terribly overused buzzword “API” actually means
  2. How we can use an API to easily do this:
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This post is written for a complete beginner at programming, but if you’re here because your CTO won’t shut up about “integrating APIs for enhanced performance and cost savings”, I think you might find the next few minutes helpful too.

A vague, unhelpful definition of an API

The three letters “API” stand for “Application Programming Interface”. Here’s the type of definition you might be used to seeing (and not understanding):

An API is a software intermediary that allows two applications to talk to each…

About

Zach Gollwitzer

I write software tutorials and golf software

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